Elementary School

A drawing of a dog standing on blue rug with starts on it. There is text over the top of the image t

Dogs for Defense:
Hero Hounds


This program is customized to best fit grades K - 2nd.
At a time when every American was asked to make sacrifices for the American war effort, World War II marked the establishment of Dogs for Defense, a program to which families donated their pet dogs to serve in the U.S. military. These four-legged recruits were transformed through training from loving pets into working troops. Students hear the story of Chips, a real Hero Hound who left the family sofa, entered the battlefield, and returned home a hero. Then they will create their own Hero Hound.
K-9 Corps
Rosie the Riveter

Dogs for Defense:
K-9 Corps


This program is customized to best fit grade levels 3rd - 5th.
At a time when every American was asked to make sacrifices for the American war effort, World War II marked the establishment of Dogs for Defense, a program to which families donated their pet dogs to serve in the U.S. military. These four-legged recruits were transformed through training from loving pets into working troops. Students participate in fun activities to learn about the ideal breeds chosen to best fulfill the duties needed to serve in the K-9 Corps.

Rosie the Riveter


When America's men left to fight with the Allies in World War II, women were recruited through posters and other propaganda to work at non-traditional jobs in defense plants and factories. Many women had always held jobs outside the home, but this was the first time they were being paid well and taught skilled labor. Many other women had not held a paying job outside of their home and this was a new experience to earn money for their hard work. These "Rosie the Riveters" proved their abilities to America and themselves and have not looked back since.
A drawing of three kids walking with items from World War II. There is text at the bottom that reads

Attic Artifacts:
World War II Kids


Following World War II, many Americans kept souvenirs of lost loved ones or their time in the war. Many of these articles were stored in boxes or trunks and then tucked away in attics, basements, and garages for decades. In this program, students learn what qualifies as a primary source, and how important they are as sources of information. Students handle and evaluate images, documents and a variety of artifacts from World War II.
Dwight D. Eisenhower leaning over a document with a child on either side of him

Constitution Day


 A joint resolution passed in 1956 requested President Eisenhower to proclaim the week of September 17 each year as "Constitution Week"in order to celebrate the signing of the supreme law of our land--the U.S. Constitution-- on that date in 1787. In this program, students will commemorate this historical document as they learn about the three branches of government, with emphasis on the executive branch. They will participate in several activities that encourage students to develop habits of good citizenship for America's future.
Cold War Kids, Duck and Cover

Cold War Kids:
Duck & Cover


The Civil Defense Administration educated and reassured all Americans that they could survive an atomic attack from the Soviet Union. This included children who received lessons from Bert the Turtle on how to "duck and cover" to protect themselves. In this program, students view 1950s civil defense artifacts and learn the realities of being a Cold War kid.